8 ways to have a cosy time in Greenland

Greenlanders love to cultivate cosiness – whether that’s by completely enjoying your own company by curling up with the cat, a heavy blanket, and a good book… by feng-shuiing your living room on a Saturday morning… or by inviting friends over for a dinner party. 

I think every culture can recognise the concept of a true comfort activity. Think about gathering to watch American football games on Saturday afternoons in USA with chips, dips and beer. Think about shinrin-yoku / forest bathing in Japan to destress and reconnect with nature. Think about knitting in the Faroe Islands.

Here’s how I ‘do cosy’ in Greenland!

1. Go to Kaffemik (or host your own) – Kaffemik is a get-together of one’s family, friends, colleagues, and acquaintances to celebrate exciting life events like a new baby, a baby’s christening, a child’s first day of school, birthdays, confirmations, weddings, a new house, etc. As host, you spend days baking and cooking in advance to fill your table with oodles of cakes, biscuits, coffee, tea, and all sorts of good things on the big day. The entire day is exciting and joyful with a constant flow of people coming and going. As guest, you bring a small gift for the honorary person. People often make Facebook groups to spread the news about kaffemik, but word of mouth is also just as effective, especially in the small settlements.



2. Make arts & crafts – Of course, stretching your artistic legs requires that you have artistic legs to begin with, but for me, I have always loved putting energy toward drawing and painting and making beautiful things. The hours just fly by! Here is a card I made one evening for my friend out of plain old sequins, card stock, needle & thread, and a little inspiration from the Greenlandic women’s national costume, plus a few beaded necklaces I’ve made which also pay homage to the colourful patterned nuilarmiut, or pearl collar from the costume.


3. Make sealskin crafts – There’s no shortage of sealskin in Greenland, and using it is not only fashionable but functional. I love to make things for others, and what a luxurious gift sealskin is! I once made a vibrant red sealskin belt for my friend to wear at her wedding, and I’ve even made cell phone pouches out of the same. When the temperatures are very cold, sealskin works as a perfect insulator to keep your phone warm – and on! ‘Sewing clubs’ are a common thing in Greenland, but I’ll admit that all the ones I have experienced end up being much more about socialising than sewing – not necessarily a bad thing. Read here about my creations.


4. Relax with cosy candles and hot teaSelf-hygge is not always my strongest point. I admit, it can be a challenge for me to make myself stay in because I’m constantly wanting to be active, socialise, and take advantage of the fun events that happen in Nuuk. But when I do finally take that evening to relax with candlelight and a big pot of tea on a cold night, it feels oh so good!

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5. Bake delicious treats – Even if there’s no kaffemik on the immediate horizon, practice makes perfect, right? I don’t think there ever needs to be a ‘good reason’ to make something tasty!!


6. Make homemade soap – Okay, this one isn’t my own hobby, and I don’t think it’s that common anyway, but I have assisted my friend with soap-making twice now. It’s pretty fun! We tried a simple and gentle baby soap recipe with light lavender and bergamot scents. There’s something satisfying about seeing your hard work (1.5 hours of stirring with an electric mixer definitely counts as hard work!) come to something useful in a few weeks’ time. PS – the goggles and gloves are just a safety precaution when preparing the first step. The rest of the process is more fun and less mad-scientist! Photo credit: The Fourth Continent.


7. Eat meals together with others – Food is a universal language, and people bond when sitting to a shared table, no matter what. Whether it’s Friday morning breakfast at the office (a common thing in Greenland) or a burger night with friends or a little bit fancy dinner, meals are typically a super cosy time with tables full of delicious food, good conversation, and laughter.


8. Sunbathe on the terrace – Nearly every single town and village in Greenland is built on the coastline, so that means nearly every flat and house has some sort of fjord- or ocean-view and a terrace to take it in. Summers in Greenland can get quite warm, so shorts and t-shirts suit perfect for outdoor time. But when the view is that perfect, sometimes you also need a terrace day in the middle of winter. Here’s The Fourth Continent and I on her terrace out in Qinngorput on 14 February this year. With a thermos of good tea and some snacks, we stayed out there and chit-chatted for almost two hours!

Luckily for us, it does eventually get warm enough to sit outside without the winter jacket 🙂


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The Greenlandic Christmas tree: a new Greenlandic tradition?


FullSizeRender (2) Instagram photo by: @hannekirkegaard83

A tree grows in Greenland

This year marks the first year that the local forest supplied Christmas trees in Greenland. Unlike the coniferous giants found elsewhere in the world, the trees from Narsarsuaq in South Greenland are diminutive yet cute and fragrant, which South Greenlanders say they prefer over the imported ilk.

All right, ‘local’ has to be taken with a little grain of salt, as these trees were originally transplanted from abroad back in the 1980’s. Spruces from Alaska and Norway, Pine from western USA, and other species from Russia and elsewhere make up Kalaallit Nunaata Orpiuteqarfia, the Greenlandic Arboretum, a true forest.

UAK_Forest Greenlandic Arboretum in Narsarsuaq. Photo by: Kenneth Høegh

Unique Greenlandic scent

Evidently the Greenlandic trees have a scent that suits perfectly to a Greenlander’s nose. Check out this video from the local news about the new trend of Greenlandic Christmas trees. “Tipigi!” is how the clip opens, which is a Greenlandic exclamation when something smells strongly – good strong, in this case.

Fun fact that has absolutely nothing to do with Christmas but everything to do with celebrating special days – Greenlanders write “Tipigi!” on a friend’s or relative’s Facebook wall the day before their birthday to poke a little fun at them.

Holiday markets, orange stars, and other festivities

Christmas trees aren’t the only way Greenlanders celebrate the holidays. Santa Claus comes by in a red helicopter to visit the children, homemade goods are sold at the holiday market, and people hunker down for hygge in the comfort of their own homes, to name a few. Read more here on Greenland.com!

Juullimi pilluarit ukiortaassamilu! That’s Greenlandic for “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!”